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Sujongsa Temple (수종사)

  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
  • Sujongsa Temple (수종사)
Address
186, Bukhangang-ro 433beon-gil, Namyangju-si, Gyeonggi-do
경기도 남양주시 조안면 북한강로433번길 186 (조안면)
Type
Temples/ Religious Sites
Inquiries
• 1330 Travel Hotline: +82-2-1330
(Korean, English, Japanese, Chinese)
• For more info: +82-31-576-8411
  • Information
    Introduction
    Sujongsa Temple is visited heavily by both the believers of the religion as well as people who enjoy hiking, owing to its mild condition of trekking route reaching about a little over 600 meters, and its convenient location from Seoul. Nestled in Joan-myeon of Namyangju-si, Gyeonggi-do, the temple has a commanding view over Bukhangang River, which is rated to have one of the most magnificent views.

    According to an old tale, the temple was founded after King Sejo (1417-1468) spent a night in Yangsu-ri region on his way back from Geumgangsan Mountain. As the king was enjoying the night view, he heard clear ringing sounds of a bell. Next day, when the villagers were asked where this sound had come from, they answered the only place they suspect would be the old temple site in Ungilsan Mountain away from the village. When King Sejo sent people to investigate, they found an old temple site inside a cave with statues of the Eighteen Arhats. They also found out that the source of bell sounds were not from an actual bell, but it was a sound made from water droplets falling onto a rock surface. Upon knowing this, the king ordered to raise a temple at the site and named the temple “Sujongsa,” meaning “temple of water bell.” The temple since then had gone through many reconstructions and expansions, which were severely damaged during the Korean War. In 1975, Monk Hyegwang began repairs, starting with Daeungbojeon Hall and slowly expanded the temple site subsequently.

    Closed
    N/A (Open all year round)

    Parking Facilities
    Inside Iljumun Gate (approx. 50 spaces)
    Outside Iljumun Gate (approx. 20 spaces)

    Admission Fees
    Free

    Restrooms
    Available

    Parking Fees
    Free

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